OEMS FOR A DYING MAN
BY
ROBERT WALLACE PAOLINELLI


Poem for a Dying Man

       I

Skin and bones.
Morphine eases
your pain;but
you will die––
nonetheless.

You helped de–
sign an oil
pipeline a
thousand miles
long.But in
this ghost house
hospital, you
are just another
ICU patient in
a coma, breathing
oxygen pumped
into your lungs 
through a plastic
tube coming out
of the wall into
the plastic mask
over your nose and
mouth.

You can't move;
you can't talk;
you are already
a corpse.

You did not hear
my voice or feel
the touch of my
hand;and you were
oblivious to the
prayers to St.
Michael and Padre
Pio of your wife,
who like a sentinel,
has been at your
side night and day.

Somewhere in the
living corpse of
you, somewhere in
or near your guts
and blood and sweats

and muscles and
cells, is the
immortal soul.

So as I look at
you all emaciated
and numb to the
world, I don't 
feel too badly
knowing you are
near to the
Golden Light.

At noon I left.
Are you still
alive?


*/*/*/*/*/*/

     II

This morning I
bought a fresh
loaf of cornbread.
The baker put it 
in a white paper
bag.
When I broke off
the pointed end,
I gave thanks to
God for my daily
bread.

On the way to visit
a dying man, I ate
the bread.It was my
breakfast.Just bread,
taken into my mouth
in communion with 
the divine.

When the loaf was
finished, I scattered
the crumbs for the
birds.

I needed a piece
of paper.I had no
paper;but I had a
paper bag, white;a
perfect sheet for
my needs.

Even the lowly bread bag
sustains my poet's urge,
and is twice used:once to
carry my bread, now to re–
cord my sentiments.

The Muse did not
forget the paper.
*/*/*/*/*/*/


      III

A lone bamboo
flute serenades
the eventide
and I am a little sad.

The world
readies itself
for sleep:The birds 
have stopped singing
and all the dogs
are quiet;even
the cats do not
stir.

Nothing moves.
The air is only
filled with the
sound of a
shakuhachi
.

Oh, I am
both happy and
sad.I want
to luagh and
cry...
*/*/*/*/*/*/ 


The three
jewels:
The Dharma
The Sangha
The Trans–
cension of the
finite self
into the
realm of
negating the
world and
finding re–
fuge in the
lotus.
*/*/*/*/*/*/


   V

Underneath
my street
clothes
is a naked
monk.
*/*/*/*/*/*

   VI

Waiting.
Nothing waits for life
or death.
Life is.
Death is.
There is no waiting for
either.
Life is.
Death is.
Sanctities.
All around us is the answer.
Look under your feet.

Amid the dust and dirt and
grime is the
divine.  Look!
Can't you
see it?
*/*/*/*/*/*/


   VII

At an old friend's
house.

Our sons are
young men;many
years have passed
since we met.

This afternnon we shared
a late lunch.We ate
as much as we wanted.

Outside the sun was
shining and the wind
was moving the trees.

Everything in the house
was quiet except for
our knives and forks
and our teeth.

It is good to have
young sons
to think about 
and to have an 
old friend to go to
after one has visi–
ted a dying man. 
*/*/*/*/*/*


   VII

The shakuhachi is a
piece of bamboo with
holes drilled into it.

Nothing special:
wood
space
air
lips
tongue
fingers.

How then is its
dulcet music
made?

Can spit laden
air, space and a
piece of common
bamboo make
such ethereal music?
    Yes.
Listen.Can't
you hear it?
*/*/*/*/*/*

Mill Valley
October 14th, 1996


young sons